New York Law School

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Video: Voting Rights Litigation Training

Friday, January 31, 2014 the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy held the Voting Rights Litigation Training at New York Law School. Featured speakers included: Gerry Hebert (Executive Director and Director of Litigation, Campaign Legal Center), Ezra Rosenberg (Partner at Dechert, LLP), Paul Smith (Partner at Jenner & Block), Juan Cartagena (President and General Counsel of LatinoJustice PRLDEF), Natasha Korgaonkar (NAACP Legal Defense Fund), and Myrna Perez (Deputy Director, Brennan Center for Justice). The video of this event is now available to stream. Read more

Racial Justice Project Files Amicus Brief on Behalf of Congressman John Lewis

Today the NYLS Racial Justice Project filed an amicus brief on behalf of Congressman John Lewis in Shelby County v. Holder, a challenge to the constitutionality of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which will be argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in February.

Congressman Lewis is recognized as one of the “Big Six” leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, along with Dr. King, Whitney Young, A. Phillip Randolph, James Farmer and Roy Wilkins. He was one of the planners and keynote speakers at the March on Washington in August 1963.

On March 7, 1965, Congressman Lewis led one of the most dramatic protests of the Civil Rights Movement. The day came to be known as “Bloody Sunday.” That day Congressman Lewis led protestors over the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. At the end of the bridge, they were met by Alabama State Troopers. When the marchers stopped to pray, the police discharged tear gas and mounted troopers charged the demonstrators, beating them with night sticks. Congressman Lewis was severely beaten and his skull was fractured. Today, political historians and constitutional scholars acknowledge that Bloody Sunday was the main impetus for President Lyndon Johnson submitting the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to Congress on March 15, 1965.

The Racial Justice Project’s brief attests to the high price many paid for the enactment of the Voting Rights Act and discusses the mechanisms that continue to suppress, dilute, and infringe upon minorities’ constitutional right to vote. To read the brief, click here.

2013 Symposium Announced: Remembering the Dream, Renewing the Dream

SAVE THE DATE! Friday, September 13, 2013 at New York Law School

Remembering the Dream, Renewing the Dream: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” Speech and the March on Washington

On the 50th Anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech and the March on Washington, leaders of the civil rights movement will join prominent civil and human rights attorneys and legal scholars to reflect on the impact Dr. King’s speech and the March had on the civil rights movement, examine civil rights enforcement in the federal courts, and discuss the legacy of these events today and for the future.

For more information or to pre-register, visit the symposium website at www.nyls.edu/RememberingTheDream.

Sponsored by the Justice Action Center at New York Law School, the New York Law School Racial Justice Project, and the New York Law School Law Review. Selected papers presented at the symposium will be published in a future issue of the New York Law School Law Review.

Professor Deborah Archer in HuffPost

Professor Deborah Archer’s blog post, “The Soft Bigotry of Low Expectations: Why Affirmative Action Still Matters” is now featured in The Huffington Post. In her post, Professor Archer explores the importance of race-conscious university admissions programs like those currently under review by the Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas. She also exposes the flawed reasoning underlying conservative attacks on affirmative action. Read the complete post here.

RJP Files Amicus Brief in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin

Today, the New York Law School Racial Justice Project filed an amicus curiae brief in Fisher v. The University of Texas at Austin, a case the U.S. Supreme Court will hear in October.  The case is a challenge to UT Austin’s consideration of race as a factor in undergraduate admissions and will be the first time the Court addresses affirmative action in higher education since Grutter v. Bollinger in 2003. Read more

Racial Justice Project Releases Food Deserts Report

Unshared Bounty Report

The New York Law School Racial Justice Project and the Racial Justice Program of the American Civil Liberties Union have co-authored a report on food deserts —areas with either no access or limited access to fresh, affordable food—and the impact on communities of color.  The report is titled Unshared Bounty:  How Structural Racism Contributes to the Creation and Persistence of Food Deserts.  Approximately 23.5 million people in the U.S. live in low-income neighborhoods located more than 1 mile from a supermarket.  African Americans are half as likely to have access to chain supermarkets and Hispanics are a third less likely to have access to chain supermarkets than are whites.  Moreover, studies have found that minority communities are more likely to have smaller grocery stores carrying higher priced, less varied food products than other neighborhoods.

Read more

Federal Appeals Court Upholds the Constitutionality of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act

Today, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld the constitutionality of a key provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.  The case, Shelby County v. Holder, involved a challenge to the Section 5 “preclearance” provision of the Voting Rights Act.  Section 5 requires that  states and jurisdictions with the worst histories of voting discrimination submit proposed voting changes to the U.S. Department of Justice or the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia to ensure they have no discriminatory intent or effect.  The court’s opinion is critically important in the ongoing battle for fair and effective participation in our political process.  Section 5′s “preclearance” provisions are widely considered to be the heart of the Voting Rights Act.  Today, the court reaffirmed not only the necessity of having the states and jurisdictions with the worst histories of voting discrimination “preclear” any changes to their electoral process, but that Section 5 continues to be a constitutional exercise of congressional authority.  Indeed, recent efforts across the country to suppress minority voters are proof that Section 5′s “strong medicine” remains necessary. From the perspective of those who are concerned about racial justice, civil rights and political participation, the record that was before Congress makes abundantly clear that Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act is still very necessary to protect the rights of racial and ethnic minorities who live in the covered jurisdictions to effective participation in our political process.

The opinion in Shelby County v. Holder can be found here.

 

Welcome to the Race to Justice

Welcome to the new Race to Justice, the blog of the New York Law School Racial Justice Project.  Race to Justice is a forum for discussion on issues of race, justice, and equality.  While many have proclaimed that we are now living in a “post-racial” society, racism is alive and well.  Yet our nation remains unable to have meaningful conversations about race and injustice.

Through this blog we hope to increase awareness of racism and structural racial inequality that continue to plague America, and provide commentary on current events that impact racial equality.

The blog will also be a place to learn about recent court decisions that involve issues of racial justice and upcoming events.

We hope you will visit the blog often.  If you have questions about Race to Justice or the work of the Racial Justice Project, please contact us at jac@nyls.edu.

Symposium Video Now Available

With nearly 300 attendees, our spring Symposium was an unqualified success. We are grateful to the many practitioners, academics, organizers, and members of the public who prepared materials, spoke on a panel, or attended the day’s events.

For those who weren’t able to attend, we are extremely pleased to announce that video of the symposium is now available for streaming on our website. Click here to launch the video player.

Registration Now Available for Our Spring Symposium

Flyer for Symposium: Ripples of Injustice
Ripples of Injustice:
The Impact of Criminal Justice Policies on Minority Communities

The Justice Action Center’s Racial Justice Project and the Racial Justice Project of the American Civil Liberties Union are pleased to co-sponsor a one-day conference in New York City for advocates, organizers, litigators, researchers, and individuals to explore the impact of criminal justice policies and practices on minority communities. The conference will take place on Friday, April 27, 2012, at New York Law School. The conference will explore the long-term impact of criminal justice policies on the home communities. For more information, including registration, a complete schedule of events, and continuing legal education information, please visit the conference website: www.nyls.edu/Symposium2012.